Member Miniatures: big ART in small packages

January 12 – May 30, 2019

Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm; Friday: 10:00 am – 9:00 pm; and Sunday: 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm.

The Monmouth Museum values the arts and artists, especially our Artist Members! Museum members are an essential part of the Museum’s success. Back by popular demand, for the fifth year, Member Miniatures: big ART in small packages, will be presented in both the Nilson and Hallway Galleries. This juried exhibition represents artists’ small works, no larger than 12”x12” when framed, in a variety of media.

Museum Member Artists in this juried exhibition: Raiz; Craig Abel; Nancy Aufiero; Maureen Barbieri; William Beam; Pamela Benham;
Phyllis Biondolillo; Dawn DiCicco; Mariah Doren; Chris Ernst; Teri Fiore; Richard Franco; Megan Gray; Gaye Harrison Zagurski; Margret Hofmann; Alison Hyland; Eric Johanson; Sue Kasdon; Jill Kerwick; Joan Knauer; Sheila Kramer; Stanley Kramer; Louise Kransniewicz; Colleen Lineberry; Marie Maber; Carol Magnatta; Tim McCourt; Lucretia Mcguff Silverman; Mary A. McKay; Charles Micucci; Sarah Magnoni; Jean Montgomerie; Johanna Paas;
Maria Payer; Paula Pearl; Irene Pomirchy; David Ramirez; Richard Rappleyea; Gustav Rosenlof; Bill Ross, Ellen Rubinstein; Elaine Shor; Mariette Boerstoel Streefland; Cecilia Swatton; Sandy Taylor; Carla Valentino; Concetta E. Volpe; Faith Wright; Lois Wilkes; Eric Williams.

Admission to the Museum is $8.
The Museum is located at 765 Newman Springs Road, Lincroft, NJ on the campus of Brookdale Community College, Parking Lot #1, off Museum Drive.

NJ Emerging Artists Series presents

Veronica Juyoun Byun: Tactile Memories

April 26 – May 22, 2019

Image: Memoirs of Lady, 60″H x 40″W x 4″D, Slip-Cast Porcelain Glaze fired to Cone 10 Reduction.

Gallery Talk: May 22, 7:00 – 8:00 pm

Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm and Sunday: 12:00 – 5:00 pm

The Artist Gallery Talk is FREE and Open to the Public

Artist Statement:
I want my work to be a gateway, to touch viewer more viscerally. What is felt then is both concrete and atmospheric. Furthermore, I believe in the notion that art is a language that can deliver a meaning of what is felt or sensed, but remains invisible. What is invisible is always there in a work; it is a message that is mysterious and profound. For myself, working in clay allows me the opportunity to offer “tactile pictures” and a range of impressions that I have gathered over time. These include memories and questioning my own Korean identity. While these impressions are unique to my experience, I believe they also cross the lines of shared human experience. Things that I have seen, heard, touched, and tasted turn into subject matter for my work. Everything that I experience in life has a potential for providing a basis from which my work can be born.

Artist Gallery Talk

Veronica Juyoun Byun: Tactile Memories

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

The colors and customs of Korea are a source of inspiration for my work. They are an integral part of my personality as well as a source for developing a palate from which to elicit emotion. Rainbow or primary color schemes symbolize protection, especially from sources of evil. While Buddhist traditions are full of symbolizations relative to the finding and enduring paradise on earth, my goal is to discover new imagery that suggests these traditions yet in personal and signifying framework-using clay as the medium for expression.

Motion and movement are important aspects in my work as it relates to the sinuous thrust of expansive space which I view as a metaphor for the human condition, and like the world is more than the sum of its parts. In this respect my ceramic installations are membranes or skins, through which a viewer can experience as a kind of portal, or means of access. The installations I create are dimensional reliefs that serve to enclose and protect. My work is always defined by interior space, where the wall is a passage, path and gap. The walls that I occupy are continuous; they activate imaginary passage between two cultures.

My work narrates and patterns my memories. I am moved to transforms a simple mass of clay into a very dynamic skin of space, in which geometries extend its territories. As drawn particles of memory, my work, like the cells of skin, are planted on the wall and hence become products of meditation. Utilizing methods of repetition, my ceramic sculptures and large wall installations offer me a unique opportunity to unfold impressions on this existence. In this respect I am interested in how my work occupies real and continuous architectural space, and become integrated in existing its surrounding and space.www.veronicabyun.com

NJ Emerging Artists Series presents

Andrew Bencsko III: ex tempore

May 31 – June 30, 2019

IMAGE: Reconstruction of Faith • Oil Pastel on Arches Paper, 12 x 16, 2018

Opening Reception: May 31, 6:00 – 8:00 pm | Gallery Talk: June 5, 7:00 – 8:00 pm

Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm and Sunday: 12:00 – 5:00 pm

The Opening Reception and Artist Gallery Talk are FREE and Open to the Public

Artist Statement:

My abstractions stem from observations of heaps of discarded materials and debris during my hectic daily commute through NYC’s streets and subways. References of these seemingly thoughtless piles are made through snapshots and thumbnail sketches and in such a moment, they become compositions.I seek to depict the unconventional relationships of different forms and maze-like formations. On the surface, they are excess pieces of lumber, steel frames, and miss-cut studs from construction sites along with broken gypsum board, plastic wrap, conduit and empty coffee cups. In my paintings I emphasize not the actual subject matter, but the varying patinas, the lines jutting in and out from incongruent angles deviating the eye to multiple focal points. As spontaneously as I encounter these subjects and my mind composes them, I paint with the same sense of immediacy, ex tempore – on the spur of the moment, for even the slightest shift in time or space will create a new perspective and that moment is lost. That the subject is not precious nor of value increases this immediacy as it is unlikely to be reflected upon in the same way ever again.

Artist Gallery Talk

Andrew Bencsko III: ex tempore

Wednesday, June 5, 2019